The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

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The Great Game of Business started a business revolution by introducing the world to open-book management, a new way of running a business that created unprecedented profit and employee engagement.
 
The revised and updated edition of The Great Game of Business lays out an entirely different way of running a company. It wasn’t dreamed up in an executive think tank or an Ivy League business school or around the conference table by big-time consultants. It was forged on the factory floors of the heartland by ordinary folks hoping to figure out how to save their jobs when their parent company, International Harvester, went down the tubes.
 
What these workers created was a revolutionary approach to management that has proven itself in every industry around the world for the past thirty years—an approach that is perhaps the last, best hope for reviving the American Dream.

Review

"The whole concept of The Great Game of Business is beautiful –consistency, alignment, and transparency, infused with core values and brought to life with powerful mechanisms.  It is inspired and inspiring, a classic." -Jim Collins, author of Good to Great
 
“The Great Game of Business is one of the top 10 most important business books for all growth-minded company leaders to read.  Why?  It details how to create the critically important “line of sight” every employee needs to be fully engaged and driving toward a common goal.  And Jack’s book details how to get everyone in your company focused with one eye on the financial impact of their decisions.  Then watch profits and cash soar.” - Verne Harnish, CEO of Gazelles and author of The Greatest Business Decisions of All Time

"This is the  brilliant story of the most radical act committed by a  businessman in this century. You can''t run or manage  your business the old way once you read   The Great Game." - Paul Hawken

About the Author

JACK STACK is Founder, President and CEO of SRC Holdings Corporation, a 100% Employee-Owned Company employing over 1200 people, with sales of over $450,000,000. SRC Holdings Corporation operates 31 business units including Joint Ventures with John Deere, Case New Holland and Navistar, and maintains two venture capital incubator funds.
 
A pioneer of the leadership model known as Open Book Management, Stack is the author of two books on the subject, The Great Game of Business and A Stake in the Outcome.  His expertise in using the open book model has helped SRC Holdings Corporation start, acquire, and own over 60 small and medium size businesses and created thousands of jobs since 1983.  In addition, SRC Holdings Corporation has increased its stock value 292,000% since 1983.
 
Jack has been called the “smartest strategist in America” by Inc. Magazine and one of the “top 10 minds in small business” by Fortune Small Business Magazine. Jack is a contributing editor for Inc. Magazine and contributing business writer for The New York Times.
 
He is a popular public speaker and a practitioner of the open book model. SRC Holdings Corporation has received international recognition because of its success, including the Top 100 Companies to Work for in America, WorldBlu Most Democratic Workplaces, the National Business Ethics Award and the Business Enterprise Trust Award.  
 
Jack has served as a world judge for the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year Awards Institute and as an advisor for this group since 1998.  Jack designed the first ever United Way Entrepreneurial Fund to encourage innovation within the non-profit community.  He is the father of five children and grandfather of six. 
 
BO BURLINGHAM is editor-at-large—and former executive editor—of Inc. magazine and chairman of the Small Giants Community (www.smallgiants.org). His book Small Giants: Companies That Choose To Be Great Instead of Big was a finalist for the 2006 Financial Times/Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year award. His most recent book, co-authored with Norm Brodsky, is Street Smarts: An All-Purpose Tool Kit for Entrepreneurs.
 
He has also written two books with Jack Stack. The first, The Great Game of Business, was named one of 100 best business books of all time. The second, A Stake in the Outcome, has been called “the first management classic of the new millennium.” Burlingham is currently working on a book about exits. He lives in Oakland, CA, with his wife of 41 years, Lisa. They have two children and three grandchildren.

RICH ARMSTRONG is the president of The Great Game of Business, Inc. and a 20+ year veteran of SRC Holdings Corporation. Rich has been instrumental in the ongoing design and development of the GGOB methodology because of his practical, “first-hand” experience running businesses at SRC. Known for his engaging, down to earth and authentic style, Rich is a popular, versatile speaker and business coach. Rich serves on the board of Court Appointed Special Advocates for children (CASA) and the National Center for Employee Ownership (NCEO). Combined with the love and enjoyment of his family, including two wonderful children, Ryan and Rylee, Rich is an avid musician and will often be found enjoying music in his home studio.

STEVE BAKER is Vice President of The Great Game of Business, Inc., a division of employee-owned SRC Holdings Corporation. Known for his high-energy and engaging message, he has become a top-rated and sought-after speaker, author and coach on topics of Open-Book Management, Strategy & Execution, Business Literacy and Employee Engagement. Steve serves on the Board of the National Center for Employee Ownership as well as the Steering Committee for SRC’s Ownership Culture Initiative. Steve is a career marketing and branding professional and is an award-winning designer. He lives in Springfield, Missouri with his wife, JoAnn, and their three children.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1

WHY WE TEACH PEOPLE HOW TO MAKE MONEY

It''s amazing what you can come up with when you have no money, zero outside resources, and 119 people all depending on you for their jobs, their homes, even their prospects of dinner for the foreseeable future.

That''s pretty much the situation my twelve fellow managers and I faced in February 1983, our first month in business as an independent company. We were supervisors and managers at a little factory in Springfield, Missouri, that up until then had been owned by International Harvester. At the time Harvester was in big trouble, sinking faster than the Titanic, cutting loose operations like ours in a desperate attempt to stay afloat. When the company offered to sell us the factory, we jumped at the chance to save our jobs. It was like jumping into a leaky life raft in the middle of a hurricane. Our new company was loaded down with so much debt that the smallest wave could capsize us.

We were scared. We couldn''t rely on traditional ways of managing because they wouldn''t produce the kind of results we needed in time to save us. So we grabbed for something new, based on what we thought of as the higher laws of business.

THE FIRST HIGHER LAW IS:

You Get What You Give.

THE SECOND HIGHER LAW IS:

It''s Easy to Stop One Guy, But It''s Pretty Hard to Stop 100.

I don''t know where I learned these laws. You don''t hear about them in school. You pick them up on the street. But I know they are real laws of business, and they are the reason why we survived and have been successful ever since. It was out of these laws that we created the Great Game of Business. These two higher laws sum up our success; they emphasize how thoroughly dependent we are on one another--and how strong we are because of it.

I am often asked to say exactly what the Great Game of Business is. I have to admit I find this hard to do. It is not a system. It is not a methodology. It is not a philosophy, or an attitude, or a set of techniques. It is all those things and more. It is a whole different way of running a company and of thinking about how a company should be run. What lies at the heart of the Game is a very simple proposition:

The best, most efficient, most profitable way to operate a business is to give everybody in the company a voice in saying how the company is run and a stake in the financial outcome, good or bad.

Guided by this proposition, we turn business into a game that everybody in the company can play. It''s fun, but it''s more: it''s a way of tapping into the universal desire to win, of making that desire a powerful competitive force. Winning the Great Game of Business has the greatest reward: constant improvement of your life and your livelihood. You only get that reward, however, by playing together as a team, and by building a dynamic company.

Playing and winning the Game worked for us in a big way. From 1983 to 1986, our sales grew more than 30 percent per year, while we went from a loss of $60,488 in our first year to pretax earnings of $2.7 million (7 percent of sales) in our fourth year. We never laid off a single person, not even when we lost a contract representing 40 percent of our business for a whole year. By 1991, we had annual sales of more than $70 million, and our workforce had increased to about 650 people from the original 119. But the most impressive number was the value of our stock, worth 10 cents a share at the time of the buyout and by 1991 worth $18.30, an increase of 18,200 percent in nine years. As a result, hourly workers who had been with the Springfield Remanufacturing Corp. (SRC) from the beginning had holdings in the Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP) worth as much as $35,000 per person. That was almost the price of a home in Springfield in 1991.

We didn''t do this by riding some hot technology or glamorous industry. Remanufacturing is a tough, loud, dirty business. Our people work with plugs in their ears and leave the factory every day covered in grease. What SRC remanufactures are engines and engine components. We take worn-out engines from cars, bulldozers, eighteen-wheelers, and we rebuild them--saving the parts that are in good shape, fixing those that are damaged, and replacing the ones beyond repair. But in some ways engines are incidental to what we do. Our real business is education. We teach people about business. We give them the knowledge that allows them to go out and play the Game.



The basic rules of the game

People who run companies know that there are really only two critical factors in business. One is to make money and the other is to generate cash. As long as you do those two things, your company is going to be okay, even if you make mistakes along the way, as you inevitably will. I''m not saying safety is not a major issue, or quality is not a major issue, or delivery and customer service are not major issues. They are all major issues, but they are part of the process. They are not end results or even conditions of survival. In business, you can have great customer service and fail. You can have a terrific safety record and fail. You can have the best quality in your industry and fail.

THE ONLY WAY TO BE SECURE IS TO MAKE MONEY AND GENERATE CASH. EVERYTHING ELSE IS A MEANS TO THAT END.

Those simple rules apply to every business. And yet, at most companies, people are never told that the survival of the company depends on doing those two things. People are told what to do in an eight-hour workday, but no one ever shows them how they fit into a bigger picture. No one explains how one person''s actions affects another''s, how each department depends on the others, what impact they all have on the company as a whole. Most important, no one tells people how to make money and generate cash. Nine times out of ten, employees don''t even know the difference between the two.

At SRC, we teach everybody those rules, and then we build on that simple knowledge and take people all the way to the complexity of ownership. We constantly strive to paint the Big Picture for the people out on the factory floor. We try to take ignorance out of the workplace and force people to get involved, not with threats and intimidation but with education. In the process, we are trying to close one of the biggest gaps in American business--the gap between workers and managers. We''re developing a system that allows everyone to get together and work toward the same goals. To do that, you have to knock down the barriers that separate people, that keep people from coming together as a team.

THE BIGGEST BARRIER IS IGNORANCE,

which creates frustration. I really think the two are one and the same. In most companies, there are three levels of ignorance:

1. The ignorance of top management assumes that people down the ladder are incapable of understanding its problems and responsibilities.

2. The ignorance of the people on the shop floor usually means they have no idea why managers do what they do and chalk up every mistake in the company to a combination of greed and stupidity.

3. The ignorance of the middle managers means they are constantly torn between the demands of top management and those of the workforce. They really have the most difficult role in the company because they have to please two masters. If they side with their people, they''re against top management. If they side with top management, they''re in conflict with the workforce. Consequently, they can never please themselves.

What lies at the root of all this is a basic ignorance about business. Most people who work in companies don''t understand business at all. They have all kinds of misconceptions. They think profit is a dirty word. They think the owners just slip it into their bank accounts at night. They have no idea that more than 40 percent of business profits goes to taxes. They''ve never heard of retained earnings. They can''t conceive how a company might be earning a profit and yet have no cash to pay its bills, or how it might be generating cash and yet be operating at a loss.

That''s the ignorance you have to eliminate if you want to get people working together as a team. But eliminating it is tough because most people find business incredibly boring. They don''t want to hear about profits and cash flow. They really can''t get too excited about making money for somebody else. Sure, they want a job they can count on, but beyond that they''d rather not get involved. Everything they''ve ever heard about business makes it seem complicated, confusing, hard to understand, abstract, maybe even a little seamy.

That''s where the Game comes in. We tell people that they have the wrong idea about business, that it really is a game--no more complicated than baseball or golf or bowling. The main difference is that the stakes are higher. How you play softball may determine whether or not you get a trophy, but how you play the business game is going to have a big impact on whether or not you can support your family, put food on your table, fulfill your dreams. On the other hand, you don''t need to be an entrepreneurial genius like Sam Walton to succeed in business. What you do need is a willingness to learn the rules, master the fundamentals, and play together as a team.

Everything we do at SRC is geared toward getting people involved in playing the Great Game of Business. We teach people the rules. We show them how to keep score and follow the action, and then we flood them with the information they need to do both. We also give them a big stake in the outcome--in the form of equity, profits, and opportunities to move ahead as far as they want to go. We do all this, moreover, by using tools of business that have been around for a hundred years or more. The most important of those tools are the financial statements.



The basic tools of the game

When people come to work at SRC, we tell them that 70 percent of the job is disassembly or whatever, and 30 percent of the job is learning. What they learn is how to make money, how to make a profit. We offer them sessions with the accounting staff, tutoring with supervisors and foremen, instructional sheets, and so on. We teach them about after-tax profits, retained earnings, equity, cash flow, everything. We want each of them to be able to read an Income Statement and a Balance Sheet. We say, "You make the decision whether you want to work here, but these are the ground rules we play by."

Then we provide a lot of reinforcement. Once a week, for example, supervisors hold meetings throughout the company to go over the updated financial statements. Each person writes the numbers down. Those numbers show how we''re doing in relation to our annual goals, and whether or not there will be quarterly bonuses. The more people understand, the more they want to know. Competition and peer pressure, and the thrill of the chase send the numbers flying around. As people get caught up in the Game, they learn and they keep learning.

Suddenly, business makes sense to everybody. Capitalism makes sense. But to understand it, you have to look at the totality. You can''t keep your attention focused on one job, or one department, or one function. That''s what happens in most organizations: people develop a very narrow focus. The Game takes down walls. It forces people to realize that they''re on the same team, and they win or lose together. And people really do love to win together. It''s the best kind of success. It''s much more fun than winning alone. You know that you''re going to get rewarded, but so is everyone else. When you look at goals, like profit and cash flow, that makes people understand how they all depend on one another. It forces them to look at the business from the other guy''s shoes and to have a broader perspective.



Ignorance can kill a company

What amazes me is that more companies don''t do this. I worked at a giant International Harvester plant near Chicago for ten years. On Fridays I''d go to a staff meeting where the plant manager said, "We gotta make more money, we gotta be more profitable." But he never taught me how to make more money. We received plenty of orders--deliver a crankcase to such-and-such a line, cut down on accidents over there, get so-and-so''s productivity up. I never knew anything about making money, and here I''d supervised hundreds and hundreds of people. Finally, it dawned on me that there was a better way, the way businesses have been run for a long, long time--with the financial statements. If people know how to use them, that''s really the simplest way to run a business.

If people don''t know, they won''t understand, and they won''t do the right things, and they''ll blame you when the company fails. They''ll say, "All this time you''ve been blowing smoke up our ass, telling us what a great job we''ve been doing. Now you come back and tell us the company is going to fail. We can''t accept that. We really can''t. Where did all the money go?"



Why we play the game



Reason #1 for Playing the Game: We Want to Live Up to Our End of the Employment Bargain.

I have always believed that you take on a big obligation when you hire somebody. That person needs to bring home money, put food on the table, take care of children. You can''t take that obligation lightly. Of course, the individual has obligations to the company as well. Employment is a two-way street. But as much as possible I want it to be someone''s choice whether or not he or she leaves the company. It really bothers me to see people laid off through no fault of their own. To prevent that from happening, we have a contract among ourselves. Everything we do is based on a common understanding that job security is paramount--that we are creating a place for people to work not just this year or five years from now, but for the next fifty years and beyond. We owe it to one another to keep the company alive.

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
442 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

u571
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book about management
Reviewed in the United States on August 19, 2019
This is a great book about management, much better than most of the management books I read. There are a few reasons I liked this book 1. This book was written from the author’s real experiences in SRC by bringing a small and almost bankrupted business into a... See more
This is a great book about management, much better than most of the management books I read. There are a few reasons I liked this book

1. This book was written from the author’s real experiences in SRC by bringing a small and almost bankrupted business into a healthy and growing company.

2. Jack Stack really poured heart into it rather than copy & paste. He has many great examples, cases, tools for readers to learn.

3. I like the philosophy of the book - open book management, which has been successfully used by many companies like Netflix. Some other great business leaders like Jack Welch, Howard Schulz - they all focused on the essence of open book management (candor and transparency)

4. Last but not least, the book offered implementation guide. The GGOB is not a rocket science but rather something that every manager can learn and use.

I would recommend the book to other readers and the book is definitely worthy of your time!
5 people found this helpful
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R. McGuire
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good Ideas. Not a Perfect Fit for Every Business.
Reviewed in the United States on September 22, 2021
The Great Game of Business is an enjoyable book with ideas that any manager can implement to some extent. And for the subset of businesses that look a lot like Springfield Remanufacturing Corp., the entire Great Game of Business model could drive impressive results.... See more
The Great Game of Business is an enjoyable book with ideas that any manager can implement to some extent. And for the subset of businesses that look a lot like Springfield Remanufacturing Corp., the entire Great Game of Business model could drive impressive results.

My biggest issue with the book, though, is with its focus on managing a business entirely based on the financials. I appreciate the authors’ argument that if a company isn’t making money and generating cash, nothing else matters, but I still think, at least in many industries, focusing on strategy and differentiation is much more important than the authors are willing to acknowledge.

But overall I enjoyed the book. I liked the authors’ folksy writing style. I felt like I was having a conversation with Jack Stack about his business. I really enjoy reading the stories of businesses as they work through critical moments and The Great Game of Business is full of those stories. I also like frameworks and lists that provide structure to the lessons being shared and that help make those lessons applicable to other companies. There are two main frameworks used in parallel throughout the book: a list of “Higher Laws of Business” and a set of five tools that make up the GGOB model.

Read my full review at ClearPurpose.media
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pfarns16
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great information, but not a cure-all!
Reviewed in the United States on May 7, 2021
This book is great, and I agree with the open-book management principles it teaches. Information sharing, cultural enrichment, a tradition of winning, and many more sensible and powerful practices are discussed. The book, however, is not about incorporating a gimmick... See more
This book is great, and I agree with the open-book management principles it teaches. Information sharing, cultural enrichment, a tradition of winning, and many more sensible and powerful practices are discussed.
The book, however, is not about incorporating a gimmick or developing a strategy to influence employee or consumer behavior, but rather encouragement for changing your own mindset and how you approach business leadership and growth.
The philosophies only work if the reader really buys in to an ethereal concept which the author seems to struggle to clearly define.
All told, I''m glad I read the book and was able to glean some useful tactics to improve my own professional efforts, and would encourage anyone who wishes to learn about open-book management and how it might impact a business, career, or employee culture to give it a read and take some good notes!
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Daryl Flood
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of the top 5 BEST discoveries we ever made for our company
Reviewed in the United States on August 5, 2013
We have been a GGOB practitioner for 18 years. And it was one of our companies top 5 best discoveries. Jack Stack''s Company is in the business of re-manufacturing engines (they sell a product). My concern was how could we make Open Book Management principles... See more
We have been a GGOB practitioner for 18 years. And it was one of our companies top 5 best discoveries.

Jack Stack''s Company is in the business of re-manufacturing engines (they sell a product). My concern was how could we make Open Book Management principles work in a service business. In the early months, we adopted Jack''s three cornerstones: 1) Know the rules of the game: Create a written business plan, and involve all employees in the annual business planning process. 2) Keep score: Produce monthly financial statements, and teach all employee how to read the P&L. 3) What''s in it for me: When the company wins, pay employees Gainsharing checks each quarter. Plus we adopted Jacks meeting schedule: Managers attend weekly Great Huddle Meetings, and all employees attend Chalk Talk meetings. These meetings are designed to inform and keep the team on track with our business plan.

Results? We found Open Book Management works very well in a service business. In fact, it completely changed our culture and our employees love it. Over the years, we have had a few employee leave and take jobs with other companies. But after a few months, some of them return saying they missed our culture and playing the GGOB. I strongly recommend and endorse the GGOB.

It changed our organization... Who knows... It might change yours too!

Daryl Flood, President & CEO
Daryl Flood Relocation & Logistics

The Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company
31 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The "real" business book
Reviewed in the United States on May 7, 2017
In 1995 Tom Peters mentioned Jack''s company at a leadership conference. He said you can''t forget the name Jack Stack, sounds like something you would order at IHOP. Shortly thereafter I had a turning moment when Jack''s book was staring me in the face at Audrey''s Bookstore... See more
In 1995 Tom Peters mentioned Jack''s company at a leadership conference. He said you can''t forget the name Jack Stack, sounds like something you would order at IHOP. Shortly thereafter I had a turning moment when Jack''s book was staring me in the face at Audrey''s Bookstore in Edmonton Alberta Canada. The narrative was so intriguing that I had a hard time getting back to meetings I was attending that day. To say it was an affirmation that what I believed businesses should be and operate as was truly conformational, I wasn''t nuts. I had the good fortune of bringing GGOB coaches Sydney Moore and David Lough into my former business and our transformation began. In short order, our organization changed its culture to one of transparency, open communication, and a planning forward approach. I have had the chance to attend a number of the GGOB teams conferences over the years and I make a point of going now every September to their Annual Conference, this year it will be their 25th.
To now watch the second generation of Jack''s staff lead their organizations and observe thousands of companies using the cultural philosophy that has lead to the term open book management is simply amazing. This book is a staple and I continue to be inspired by it and gift it to leaders who get the value of empowering staff and rewarding for results.
5 people found this helpful
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Ben Donahower
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I''m in the game
Reviewed in the United States on October 11, 2019
I''m sold, well except the equity part, but this is definitely something I can run with. I love having a system and this one is aligned with ad hoc things I''ve been doing including sharing financials. But I was missing a lot of pieces and this book showed me those pieces and... See more
I''m sold, well except the equity part, but this is definitely something I can run with. I love having a system and this one is aligned with ad hoc things I''ve been doing including sharing financials. But I was missing a lot of pieces and this book showed me those pieces and what the puzzle looks like.
One person found this helpful
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K. Newcomer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Creating your own Game
Reviewed in the United States on February 8, 2011
I am reading the book 16 years later, but the message is relevant. The basis of the book is Open-Book Management or sharing the critical numbers and the financials with your employees. I know the United States was in a recession when this book was written so I took... See more
I am reading the book 16 years later, but the message is relevant. The basis of the book is Open-Book Management or sharing the critical numbers and the financials with your employees. I know the United States was in a recession when this book was written so I took seriously his explanations about not laying off people to be "lean and mean", but helping to create new opportunities and jobs.

Not every chapter is great, some were dry and too much like a self-help book, but enough good chapters to make this book successful. The chapter on setting standards had good information about thinking how to control your costs and generate cash. I liked the advice of "Don''t accept any number at face value". Meaning explore your metrics and make sure the right areas are being measured, numbers are not sacred.

The other chapter I liked was Skip the Praise-Give us the Raise. This wasn''t so much about giving a bonus, but thinking about how to give a bonus and understanding what needs to be accomplished to earn a bonus. I liked the advice of setting a goal based on the balance sheet and protecting your equity. Nice explanation in the book on how to do this.

The book is fantastic for entrepreneurs or for owners of small companies that are growing or need to diversify. The book has many great tips on how to run a business and take care of your employees at the same time. Read this book in combination with "Managing by the Numbers" by Kremer, Rizzuto, and Case.
3 people found this helpful
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Elizabeth Symons
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Get staff involved in making your business profitable.
Reviewed in the United States on December 10, 2017
Great book on how to get your staff involved and care about how your business is doing. It is a guideline to help you teach your staff what it takes to run a business and what the goals are. How do they know what to do and why if you don''t tell them. There are practice... See more
Great book on how to get your staff involved and care about how your business is doing. It is a guideline to help you teach your staff what it takes to run a business and what the goals are. How do they know what to do and why if you don''t tell them. There are practice exercises to do with staff.
2 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Simon Osborne
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Great Read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 25, 2016
When was the last time you knew that your frontline team could read the income statement and the balance sheet as well as you? When was the last time your frontline team knew that your business was off-plan, and what they could do about getting it back on plan? When was the...See more
When was the last time you knew that your frontline team could read the income statement and the balance sheet as well as you? When was the last time your frontline team knew that your business was off-plan, and what they could do about getting it back on plan? When was the last time you had a team meeting with your frontline staff and they gave you the numbers for the week that told you if you were on or off plan? Jack Stack suggests it should be every day or certainly weekly. Stack illustrates his own companies fully open-book approach to business that calls for strong leadership, managerial daring and considerable stamina. Much of what is written appears to be teaching business managers ‘how-to-suck-eggs’, in that a great deal of the content prescribes fundamental business principles, yet holding this thought detracts from the reality of his business model. And while many business leaders might extol the principles of an open-book philosophy, the perseverance and staying power required to deliver, I suggest, would exhaust many a budding open-book advocate. Throughout Stack demonstrates a business ethic that allows his frontline team to investment in their own success by benchmarking personal success as sufficient equity to purchase their own property. Everyone is a winner as stock price increases, margins are protected and efficiency encouraged. I would guess it is would be difficult to assess if a different, more autocratic management style would have brought about a higher stock price, but even if it did, I would like to think, the local communities economy would be more sustainable and at a higher level because of it.
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l girling
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 13, 2019
Excellent manual on how to develop your business to go from strength to strength, especially when in fast growth or any time.
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Gareth B.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
All makes sense
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 30, 2020
This feels like the missing part in the jigsaw about how to get people to want to commit, contribute and feel valued.
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R. Jansen
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 29, 2017
Really great insights into how to get a team fully engaged and focused for great results. Definitely worth a read.
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Alex
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
it would hate been good
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 10, 2015
If I had received it, it would hate been good!
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The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale

The online sale 2021 Great Game of Business, Expanded and Updated: The Only Sensible Way to Run a Company outlet sale